Sunday, February 17, 2013

Apostles' Creed for Lent



The purpose of the Creed or Profession of Faith is that the whole gathered people may respond to the Word of God proclaimed in the readings taken from Sacred Scripture and explained in the Homily and that they may also honor and confess the great mysteries of the faith by pronouncing the rule of faith in a formula approved for liturgical use and before the celebration of these mysteries in the Eucharist begins. (IGRM, 67)
Instead of the Niceno-Constantinopolitan Creed, especially during Lent and Easter Time, the baptismal Symbol of the Roman Church, known as the Apostles’ Creed, may be used. (Rubrics, 19)

I believe in God,
the Father almighty,
Creator of heaven and earth,
and in Jesus Christ, his only Son, our Lord, 
At the words that follow, up to and including the Virgin Mary, all bow. 
who was conceived by the Holy Spirit,
born of the Virgin Mary,
suffered under Pontius Pilate,
was crucified, died and was buried;
he descended into hell;
on the third day he rose again from the dead;
he ascended into heaven,
and is seated at the right hand of God the Father almighty;
from there he will come to judge the living and the dead.
I believe in the Holy Spirit,
the holy catholic Church,
the communion of saints,
the forgiveness of sins,
the resurrection of the body,
and life everlasting. Amen.
"When we affirm “I believe in God”, we are saying, like Abraham, “I trust in you, I entrust myself to you, O Lord”, but not as to Someone to turn to solely in times of difficulty or to whom to devote a few moments of the day or week. Saying “I believe in God” means founding my life on him, letting his Word guide it every day, in practical decisions, without fear of losing some part of myself. When, in the Rite of Baptism, the question is asked three times: “Do you believe?” — in God, in Jesus Christ, in the Holy Spirit — the holy Catholic Church and the other truths of the faith, the triple response is in the singular: “I do”, because it is my own life that with the gift of faith must be given a turning point, it is my life that must change, that must be converted. Every time we take part in a Baptism we should ask ourselves how we ourselves live daily the great gift of faith." 
-Pope Benedict XVI

Friday, February 15, 2013

Pope Benedict XVI: A man of his word


“Wherever applause breaks out in the liturgy because of some human achievement, it is a sure sign that the essence of liturgy has totally disappeared and been replaced by a kind of religious entertainment. ” 
- Joseph Cardinal Ratzinger 
(Spirit of the Liturgy p. 198)
With a humble "Grazie" as bishops doffed their mitres and applause echoed through St. Peter's Basilica, a frail Pope Benedict XVI began his long farewell by presiding over Ash Wednesday services in a tearful, final public Mass.

Smiling and clearly moved, Pope Benedict responded, "Grazie. Grazie. Now let us return to prayer" — his words bringing to an end the resounding applause that had grown in intensity over several minutes. (Alabama)

The 'Orans' position (Ash Wednesday 2013)

A Prince of the Roman Church in Orans position


Then, with hands extended, he [the celebrant] says the prayer itself together with the other concelebrants, 
who also pray with hands extended (IGRM, 237).

Archbishop Piero Marini, a liturgical scholar and Vatican II Council staff, in Orans position.

"In fact, it is perhaps the only case when the rubrics direct the priest to pray with arms extended in a prayer that he does not say alone or only with other priests. Therefore, in the case of the Our Father, the orantes posture expresses the prayer directed to God by his children." -Fr. Edward McNamara

"In the rubrics the Orans gesture is asked principally of the Main Celebrant, but on those occasions where either a priestly action is done (Eucharistic Prayer) or prayer in common (Our Father) all the concelebrants do it." - Colin B. Donovan, STL

Read more: 

Conclave 2013 (Prayers)


CELEBRATION OF THE WORD OF GOD FOR A SUCCESSFUL CONCLAVE
March 1, 2013 – (until the end of the conclave)

(Standing)
L.         O God (+), come to my assistance.
R.         Lord, make haste to help me.
            Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit.
            As it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Invocation
L.        Come Holy Spirit, fill the hearts of your faithful and kindle in them the fire of your love. Send forth your Spirit and they shall be created.
R.         And you shall renew the face of the earth.

Opening Prayer
L.         Let us pray.
Lord God, you made known to Peter your desire to bring all nations to salvation.[1] Help us to work generously for the salvation of the world so that your Church may bring us and all mankind in your presence.[2] Grant this through Christ our Lord.
R.         Amen.
(Seated)
Scriptural Reading
A reading from the Holy Gospel according to Saint Matthew (16: 13-19)
When Jesus went into the region of Caesarea Philippi he asked his disciples, “Who do people say that the Son of Man is?” They replied, “Some say John the Baptist, others Elijah, still others Jeremiah or one of the prophets.” He said to them, “But who do you say that I am?” Simon Peter said in reply, “You are the Christ, the Son of the living God.” Jesus said to him in reply, “Blessed are you, Simon son of Jonah. For flesh and blood has not revealed this to you, but my heavenly Father. And so I say to you, you are Peter, and upon this rock I will build my Church, and the gates of the netherworld shall not prevail against it. I will give you the keys to the Kingdom of heaven. Whatever you bind on earth shall be bound in heaven; and whatever you loose on earth shall be loosed in heaven.”

The Gospel of the Lord.
R. Praise to you, Lord Jesus Christ.

Or

A reading from the Holy Gospel according to Saint Luke (5: 1-11)
While the crowd was pressing in on Jesus and listening to the word of God, he was standing by the Lake of Gennesaret. He saw two boats there alongside the lake; the fishermen had disembarked and were washing their nets. Getting into one of the boats, the one belonging to Simon, he asked him to put out a short distance from the shore. Then he sat down and taught the crowds from the boat. After he had finished speaking, he said to Simon, “Put out into deep water and lower your nets for a catch.” Simon said in reply, “Master, we have worked hard all night and have caught nothing, but at your command I will lower the nets.” When they had done this, they caught a great number of fish and their nets were tearing. They signaled to their partners in the other boat to come to help them. They came and filled both boats so that the boats were in danger of sinking. When Simon Peter saw this, he fell at the knees of Jesus and said, “Depart from me, Lord, for I am a sinful man.” For astonishment at the catch of fish they had made seized him and all those with him, and likewise James and John, the sons of Zebedee, who were partners of Simon. Jesus said to Simon, “Do not be afraid; from now on you will be catching men.” When they brought their boats to the shore, they left everything and followed him.

The Gospel of the Lord.
R. Praise to you, Lord Jesus Christ.

Or

A reading from the Holy Gospel according to Saint John (21: 15-19)
Jesus had revealed himself to his disciples and, when they had finished breakfast, said to Simon Peter, “Simon, son of John, do you love me more than these?” Simon Peter answered him, “Yes, Lord, you know that I love you.” Jesus said to him, “Feed my lambs.” He then said to Simon Peter a second time, “Simon, son of John, do you love me?” Simon Peter answered him, “Yes, Lord, you know that I love you.” He said to him, “Tend my sheep.” He said to him the third time, “Simon, son of John, do you love me?” Peter was distressed that he had said to him a third time, “Do you love me?” and he said to him, “Lord, you know everything; you know that I love you.” Jesus said to him, “Feed my sheep. Amen, amen, I say to you, when you were younger, you used to dress yourself and go where you wanted; but when you grow old, you will stretch out your hands, and someone else will dress you and lead you where you do not want to go.” He said this signifying by what kind of death he would glorify God. And when he had said this, he said to him, “Follow me.”

The Gospel of the Lord.
R. Praise to you, Lord Jesus Christ.

Reflection
From a homily of Benedict XVI, pope (Solemnity of Saints Peter and Paul, June 29, 2005)
The Church is One and Catholic

Strangers have become friends; crossing every border, we recognize one another as brothers and sisters. This brings to fulfillment the mission of St Paul, who knew that he was the "minister of Christ Jesus among the Gentiles, with the priestly duty of preaching the Gospel of God so that the Gentiles [might] be offered up as a pleasing sacrifice, consecrated by the Holy Spirit" (Rom 15: 16). 
The purpose of the mission is that humanity itself becomes a living glorification of God, the true worship that God expects: this is the deepest meaning of catholicity - a catholicity that has already been given to us, towards which we must constantly start out again. Catholicity does not only express a horizontal dimension, the gathering of many people in unity, but also a vertical dimension: it is only by raising our eyes to God, by opening ourselves to him, that we can truly become one.

Like Paul, Peter also came to Rome, to the city that was a centre where all the nations converged and, for this very reason, could become, before any other, the expression of the universal outreach of the Gospel. As he started out on his journey from Jerusalem to Rome, he must certainly have felt guided by the voices of the prophets, by faith and by the prayer of Israel.

The mission to the whole world is also part of the proclamation of the Old Covenant: the people of Israel were destined to be a light for the Gentiles. The great Psalm of the Passion, Psalm 22[21], whose first verse Jesus cried out on the Cross: "My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?", ends with the vision: "All the ends of the earth shall remember and turn to the Lord; all the families of the nations shall bow down before him" (Ps 22[21]: 28). When Peter and Paul came to Rome, the Lord on the Cross who had uttered the first line of that Psalm was risen; God's victory now had to be proclaimed to all the nations, thereby fulfilling the promise with which the Psalm concludes.

Catholicity means universality - a multiplicity that becomes unity; a unity that nevertheless remains multiplicity. From Paul's words on the Church's universality we have already seen that the ability of nations to get the better of themselves in order to look towards the one God, is part of this unity. In the second century, the founder of Catholic theology, St Irenaeus of Lyons, described very beautifully this bond between catholicity and unity and I quote him. He says: "The Church spread across the world diligently safeguards this doctrine and this faith, forming as it were one family: the same faith, with one mind and one heart, the same preaching, teaching and tradition as if she had but one mouth. Languages abound according to the region but the power of our tradition is one and the same. The Churches in Germany do not differ in faith or tradition, neither do those in Spain, Gaul, Egypt, Libya, the Orient, the center of the earth; just as the sun, God's creature, is one alone and identical throughout the world, so the light of true preaching shines everywhere and illuminates all who desire to attain knowledge of the truth" (Adv. Haer. I 10, 2). The unity of men and women in their multiplicity has become possible because God, this one God of heaven and earth, has shown himself to us; because the essential truth about our lives, our "where from?" and "where to?" became visible when he revealed himself to us and enabled us to see his face, himself, in Jesus Christ. This truth about the essence of our being, living and dying, a truth that God made visible, unites us and makes us brothers and sisters. Catholicity and unity go hand in hand. And unity has a content: the faith that the Apostles passed on to us in Christ's name.

Or

From a homily of Benedict XVI, pope (Solemnity of Saints Peter and Paul, June 29, 2005)
The Church is Apostolic

We have said that the catholicity of the Church and the unity of the Church go together. The fact that both dimensions become visible to us in the figures of the holy Apostles already shows us the consequent characteristic of the Church: she is apostolic. What does this mean?

The Lord established Twelve Apostles just as the sons of Jacob were 12. By so doing he was presenting them as leaders of the People of God which, henceforth universal, from that time has included all the peoples. St Mark tells us that Jesus called the Apostles so "to be with him, and to be sent out" (Mk 3: 14). This seems almost a contradiction in terms. We would say: "Either they stayed with him or they were sent forth and set out on their travels". Pope St Gregory the Great says a word about angels that helps us resolve this contradiction. He says that angels are always sent out and at the same time are always in God's presence, and continues, "Wherever they are sent, wherever they go, they always journey on in God's heart" (Homily, 34, 13). The Book of Revelation described Bishops as "angels" in their Church, so we can state: the Apostles and their successors must always be with the Lord and precisely in this way - wherever they may go - they must always be in communion with him and live by this communion.

The Church is apostolic, because she professes the faith of the Apostles and attempts to live it. There is a unity that marks the Twelve called by the Lord, but there is also continuity in the apostolic mission. St Peter, in his First Letter, described himself as "a fellow elder" of the presbyters to whom he writes (5: 1). And with this he expressed the principle of apostolic succession: the same ministry which he had received from the Lord now continues in the Church through priestly ordination. The Word of God is not only written but, thanks to the testimonies that the Lord in the sacrament has inscribed in the apostolic ministry, it remains a living word. Thus, I now address you, dear Brother Bishops. I greet you with affection, together with your relatives and the pilgrims from your respective Dioceses. You are about to receive the Pallium from the hands of the Successor of Peter. We had it blessed, as though by Peter himself, by placing it beside his tomb. It is now an expression of our common responsibility to the "chief Shepherd" Jesus Christ, of whom Peter speaks (I Pt 5: 4). The Pallium is an expression of our apostolic mission. It is an expression of our communion whose visible guarantee is the Petrine ministry. Unity as well as apostolicity are bound to the Petrine service that visibly unites the Church of all places and all times, thereby preventing each one of us from slipping into the kind of false autonomy that all too easily becomes particularization of the Church and might consequently jeopardize her independence. So, let us not forget that the purpose of all offices and ministries is basically that "we [all] become one in faith and in the knowledge of God's son, and form that perfect man who is Christ come to full stature", so that the Body of Christ may grow and build "itself up in love" (Eph 4: 13, 16).

Or

From a homily of Benedict XVI, pope (Solemnity of Saints Peter and Paul, June 29, 2005)
The Church is Holy

Today's Gospel tells of the profession of faith of St Peter, on whom the Church was founded: "You are the Messiah... the Son of the living God" (Mt 16: 16). Having spoken today of the Church as one, catholic and apostolic but not yet of the Church as holy, let us now recall another profession of Peter, his response on behalf of the Twelve at the moment when so many abandoned Christ: "We have come to believe; we are convinced that you are God's holy one" (Jn 6: 69). What does this mean?

Jesus, in his great priestly prayer, says that he is consecrating himself for his disciples, an allusion to the sacrifice of his death (cf. Jn 17: 19). By saying this, Jesus implicitly expresses his role as the true High Priest who brings about the mystery of the "Day of Reconciliation", no longer only in substitutive rites but in the concrete substance of his own Body and Blood. The Old Testament term "the Holy One of the Lord" identified Aaron as the High Priest who had the task of bringing about Israel's sanctification (Ps 106[105]: 16; Vulgate: Sir 45: 6). Peter's profession of Christ, whom he declares to be the Holy One of God, fits into the context of the Eucharistic Discourse in which Jesus announces the Day of Reconciliation through the sacrificial offering of himself: "the bread I will give is my flesh, for the life of the world" (Jn 6: 51). So this profession is the background of the priestly mystery of Jesus, his sacrifice for us all. The Church is not holy by herself; in fact, she is made up of sinners - we all know this and it is plain for all to see. Rather, she is made holy ever anew by the Holy One of God, by the purifying love of Christ. God did not only speak, but loved us very realistically; he loved us to the point of the death of his own Son. It is precisely here that we are shown the full grandeur of revelation that has, as it were, inflicted the wounds in the heart of God himself. Then each one of us can say personally, together with St Paul, I live "a life of faith in the Son of God, who loved me and gave himself for me" (Gal 2: 20).

Moment of Silence
(Kneeling)
Intercessions

I. For the Church[3]
L. Let us pray for the Church, especially in this period of Sede Vacante.
A. O God, who in your wonderful providence decreed that Christ’s kingdom should be extended throughout the earth and that all should become partakers of his saving redemption, grant, we pray, that your Church may be the universal sacrament of salvation and that Christ may be revealed to all as the hope of the nations and their Savior. Who lives and reigns with you in the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

II. For the Conclave[4]
L. Let us pray for our Cardinals who will elect the new universal pastor of Christ’s flock.
A. O Lord, who has founded your Church upon the Apostles, pour out, we pray, upon your Princes, who will elect among your servants the successor of Peter, the spirit of wisdom and understanding, the spirit of right judgment and selfless love, so that they may strive with all their heart to know who is pleasing to be your Son’s vicar on earth. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the Holy Spirit, one God for ever and ever. Amen.

III. For the Election of a Pope[5]
L. Let us pray that God may grant us, in his chosen time, a loving pastor and successor to the See of Peter.
A. O God, eternal shepherd, who govern your flock with unfailing care, grant in your boundless fatherly love a pastor for your Church who will please you by his holiness and to us show watchful care. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the Holy Spirit, one God for ever and ever. Amen.

Short Litany
L. Mary, Mother of the Church, R. pray for us.
Saint Michael the Archangel, R. pray for us.
Holy Angels of God, R. pray for us.
Saint John the Baptist, R. pray for us.
Saint Joseph, R. pray for us.
Saint Peter and Saint Paul, R. pray for us.
All you holy men and women, Saints of God, R. pray for us.


(Standing)
Lord’s Prayer
L.         Let us make our prayers and praise complete by offering the Lord’s prayer:[6]
A.        Our Father, who art in heaven,

hallowed be thy name;

thy kingdom come,

thy will be done

on earth as it is in heaven.


Give us this day our daily bread,

and forgive us our trespasses,

as we forgive those who trespass against us;

and lead us not into temptation,

but deliver us from evil.

Concluding Prayer
L.         Let us pray.
Grant, we pray, almighty God, that your Church may always remain that holy people, formed as one by the unity of Father, Son and Holy Spirit, which manifests to the world the Sacrament of your holiness and unity and leads it to the perfection of your charity. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the Holy Spirit, one God for ever and ever.[7]
R.         Amen.

L.         May the Lord bless us (+), protect us from evil and bring us to everlasting life.
R.         Amen.

Prayer to the Blessed Virgin Mary
Sub tuum praesidium confugimus,
sancta Dei Genitrix : nostras deprecationes
ne despicias in necessitatibus,
sed a periculis cunctis libera nos semper,
Virgo gloriosa et benedicta.

Under your patronage we take refuge Holy Mother of God;
our petitions, do not despise in necessities,
but of all dangers deliver us always glorious Virgin and Blessed.



PRAYER OF THANGSGIVING FOR A NEW SUPREME PONTIFF

(Standing)
L.         Lord (+), open my lips.
R.         And my mouth will proclaim your praise.

Te Deum
You are God: we praise you;
You are the Lord: we acclaim you;
You are the eternal Father:
All creation worships you.

To you all angels, all the powers of heaven,
Cherubim and Seraphim, sing in endless praise:
Holy, holy, holy, Lord, God of power and might,
heaven and earth are full of your glory.

The glorious company of apostles praise you.
The noble fellowship of prophets praise you.
The white robed army of martyrs praise you.

Throughout the world the holy Church acclaims you:
Father, of majesty unbounded,
your true and only Son, worthy of all worship,
and the Holy Spirit, advocate and guide.

You, Christ, are the king of glory,
the eternal Son of the Father.

When you became man to set us free
you did not spurn the Virgin’s womb.

You overcame the sting of death,
and opened the kingdom of heaven to all believers.

You are seated at God’s right hand in glory.
We believe that you will come, and be our judge.

Come then, Lord, and help your people,
bought with the price of your own blood,
and bring us with your Saints
to glory everlasting.

L.         Save your people, Lord, and bless your inheritance.
R.         Govern and uphold them now and always.
L.         Day by day we bless you.
R.         We praise your name for ever.
L.         Keep us today, Lord, from all sin.
R.         Have mercy on us, Lord, have mercy.
L.         Lord, show us your love and mercy.
R.         For we put our trust in you.
L.         In you, Lord, is our hope.
R.         and we shall never hope in vain.

Prayer
L.         Let us pray for our Sovereign Pontiff N.
A.        The Lord preserve him and give him life, and make him blessed upon the earth, and deliver him not to the will of his enemies.

            O God, who chose your servant N. in succession to the Apostle Peter as shepherd of the whole flock, look favorably on the supplications of your people and grant that, as Vicar of Christ on earth, he may confirm his brethren and that the whole Church may be in communion with him in the bond of unity, love and peace, so that in you, the shepherd of souls, all may know the truth and attain life eternal. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the Holy Spirit, one God for ever and ever.[8]

Lord’s Prayer
L.         Let us again offer our praise to God and pray in the words of Christ:[9]
A.        Our Father, who art in heaven,

hallowed be thy name;

thy kingdom come,

thy will be done

on earth as it is in heaven.


Give us this day our daily bread,

and forgive us our trespasses,

as we forgive those who trespass against us;

and lead us not into temptation,

but deliver us from evil.

Concluding Prayer
L.         Let us pray.
O God, who always listen mercifully to your servants in distress, we humbly beseech you as we give thanks for your kindness, that, free from all evil, we may constantly serve you in gladness. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the Holy Spirit, one God for ever and ever.[10]
R.         Amen.

L.         May the Lord bless us (+), protect us from evil and bring us to everlasting life.
R.         Amen.

Prayer to the Blessed Virgin Mary
Hail Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee;
Blessed art thou among women,
and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus.
Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners,
now and at the hour of death. Amen.


Prepared by:                                                                                Sources:
Dave Ceasar Dela Cruz                                                              - The Roman Missal, Third Edition
Liturgist                                                                                       - The Liturgy of the Hours
                                                                                    - Handbook of Prayers, James Socias



[1] Midday Prayer, Week I.
[2] Midafternoon Prayer, Week I.
[3] MR2002, Masses and Prayers for Various Needs and Occassions: For the Church, A.
[4] Ibid: For a Council or a Synod.
[5] Ibid: For the Election of a Pope or a Bishop.
[6] Liturgy of the Hours III: Brief Invitation to the Lord’s Prayer, 657.
[7] MR2002, Masses and Prayers for Various Needs and Occassions: For the Church, C.
[8] MR2002, Masses and Prayers for Various Needs and Occassions: For the Pope, second option.
[9] Liturgy of the Hours III: Brief Invitation to the Lord’s Prayer, 657.
[10] MR2002, Masses and Prayers for Various Needs and Occassions: For Giving Thanks to God, A.